Ihre Browserversion ist veraltet. Wir empfehlen, Ihren Browser auf die neueste Version zu aktualisieren.

This page contains the following 2014 newsletters starting with the latest:

 October, July, April, January.

Separated by XXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

 

The Newsletter of the Chartered Institute of Linguists German Society e.V.

October 2014

 

Letter from the Chair

After talking about previous study weekends in Hanover, we realised that this year’s study weekend was the 23rd in the history of the GS. Since most of our members live so far apart, each weekend is an excellent opportunity to meet up, discover a new area and learn more about a variety of subjects. The topics have ranged from minority languages in Germany (Sorbian, Danish, Platt et al), historical links between Germany and the UK (Prince Albert, the Hanoverians etc), literature (Fontane) to the Battle of Blenheim and an escape from Colditz. Each study weekend depends to a large extent on the organisers who sacrifice a lot of time, thought and effort to create a successful event, for which we are always extremely grateful.

 This year’s visit to Hanover was well-organised by local members Brian and Ursula Rouvray. They also managed to cope with the inconvenience of two triathlons in the centre of Hanover as well as the train drivers’ strike on Saturday! Our speakers gave us a fascinating historical insight into the Hanoverian dynasty which enabled us to get a lot more from the various exhibitions we visited. Most of us managed to spot several pictures and caricatures which had been shown in the  presentations. The Scottish Referendum debate added extra interest, since the political union of England and Scotland occurred just before the Hanoverians came to the throne. Unfortunately we were not in Hanover for the Last Night of the Proms or we could have joined the “Public Viewing” in the park! For a full report see page 3.

Our last event in 2014 is the Translators’ Workshop in Frankfurt am Main. There are a few places still available, so book now. We’re very grateful to Mike Harrington and Ilse Freiburg for organising the workshop with such a varied selection of topics. Full details are on page 6.

Finally, put the date of the 2015 AGM in your diaries. We will be in Duisburg on Saturday 7th March. After the AGM we hope to have a guided tour by local mathematician and philosopher Gerhard Mercator.

All the best from me and the Committee.

Stephanie

 Page 2

 A welcome blast from the past

 (After the AT in Potsdam, Janet Berridge also had the opportunity to attend the opening event of the annual AIIC Conference in Berlin, and has kindly written this report.

Although I consider myself a founder member of the German Society of the Institute of Linguists (having been part of the group who called the regional group into being in the late 1980s and serving as chairman from 1988 to 1990), my connections with the group in recent years have been rather sporadic, as I have lived in England since 1995. However, having met my husband on the society's first "trip east", to Weimar in 1991, I am very happy to maintain my ties and to join colleagues occasionally at meetings, as I did in 2011 in Heidelberg. In 2005 I bought a flat in east Berlin and we now spend a considerable amount of time in the German capital. When I saw that the Anglophoner Tag 2014 would take place in Potsdam, I was determined to join the party: I was not disappointed.

The event was – no surprise – very well run, and there was ample opportunity to catch up with old friends and make new contacts. The contributions were all well prepared and informative and the evening boat trip a delightful climax to the weekend. What really impressed me deeply, however, was the talk, backed up by an excellent exhibition, by Elke Limberger-Katsumi: "The pioneers and their achievement: Simultaneous interpreting proves a success at the Nuremberg trials."

Not being an interpreter myself, I only have a passive knowledge of the highly skilled nature of this profession. I have often been asked to interpret at various events and have in most cases refused, pointing out that I am a translator and that there is a world of difference between the (passive) task of translating a text and the (very active) role of a simultaneous interpreter. I have done a little informal (mostly consecutive) interpreting for business and for an English tour guide who takes people interested in space flight to Peenemünde on the Baltic coast.

The story that Elke Limberger-Katsumi had to tell was both fascinating and poignant. Amid the turmoil of the final stages of the last World War, the plan to try the Nazi leaders for crimes against humanity at an internationally recognized court began to take shape. The legal requirements were clear: judges from the four Allied powers (the USA, Great Britain, France and Russia), legal representatives for the accused and the witnesses. The big problem was: there were at least 4 languages involved (English, French, Russian and German). Making the trials happen and achieving the logistical goal of bringing all the players together in war-ravaged Nürnberg and providing simultaneous interpreting on this scale was an epic task. It was essential to find linguists capable of interpreting under pressure and of maintaining a totally neutral stance throughout, despite the harrowing testimonies. The technical details look primitive at a distance of almost 70 years: cabling ran all over the floors, and recording was often interrupted when someone tripped over the cables; the "booths" were not sound-proofed, and housed three interpreters at a time, working from one language into the three others and back. Nevertheless, the task was achieved: people of mixed parentage who had lived in various European countries were in demand; some had not interpreted before, and training was given. Interrogations of the accused served as a "practice ground" for the trials.

Page 3

The fact that this all took place so long ago means that very few of the interpreters are still alive, but some of them left written or spoken testimony of their experience, and the AIIC exhibition featuring information panels with biographical details of many of the men and women who undertook this work was very informative. Most recently a book by one of the Russian interpreters had shed light on the Soviet side of the trials.

Since the Anglophoner Tag, the exhibition (and Elke's wonderful, personal presentation) has been on show at the AIIC Annual Congress in Berlin. Further events on this topic are scheduled for the autumn in Nürnberg.

Janet Berridge

 GS study weekend in Hanover

Despite the best efforts of Deutsche Bahn and Lufthansa, we all made it to Hanover one way or another for a full, enjoyable and informative weekend (a tradition of over 20 years' standing now). After the usual happy get-together on the Friday evening, the programme proper kicked off on Saturday morning with our three excellent speakers.

The first was Nicola Hayton, President of the Deutsch-Britische Gesellschaft Rhein-Neckar, whom some of you will remember from the Study Weekend in Heidelberg in 2011. Nicola's talk was entitled 'From would-be monarch to a reluctant king: the role of family in the Hanoverian succession'. Her invaluable handout included a Stuart and Hanoverian family tree, to which I at least will continue to refer when memory fails and confusion intrudes. And the story began with Nicola's talk in Heidelberg in 2011, with 'The Winter Queen', daughter of James I, and her daughter Sophia, who against all the odds 'did well for herself', and was the mother of the man who became George I.

Our first George didn't speak English, and came to Britain as it were malgré soi, at a time when Europe was seriously divided along religious lines. Many other aspirants to the throne were cast aside simply because they were not Protestants, a major concern at the time being to ensure a Protestant succession. Incidentally, we learned that the Union flag dates back to 1606, showing the Scottish saltire cross firmly to the fore. More on this subject later on.

While Georges I and II visited Hanover, George III never did, perhaps making his statement that 'I wish I was back in Hanover to get myself a belly full' all the more remarkable. Dr. Thorsten Riotte of the history faculty at Frankfurt am Main's Goethe University spoke on whether this statement really did constitute a serious wish or intention to abdicate (a controversial issue in academic circles). At a time when Pitt the Younger was perceived as pulling the strings, and when 'Farmer George' was prey to recurrent and severe illness thought at the time to be insanity, both speculation and criticism were rife. While George III definitely saw himself as a Hanoverian prince, he was born and bred in England and 'gloried in the name of Briton'. It was said at one point indeed that 'Elector George was willing to declare war on King George'. However, Thorsten concluded that he did not think there had been a real threat of abdication.

Finally, Andrew Thompson, Director of Studies at Queen's College Cambridge, addressed us on 'Fathers and sons: politics, argument and family among the Hanoverians'. The backdrop to events and sentiment was the all-too-vivid and traumatic memory of regicide, the role of a strong, hierarchical church, and the equation of Catholicism with foreign rule. Andrew mentioned incidentally that the terms Whig and Tory, depicting the two mainstream political groupings of the time, were both insults from the Celtic fringe. It was generally perceived at the time, too, that Britain was different,

Page 4 

liberal and separate (well the first and last points certainly still apply!). It is sometimes claimed that the Hanoverian father-son disagreements had purely psychological origins (George II for example responded strongly to George I's banishment of his wife), but Andrew saw other reasons as well. For one thing, there was no clearly defined role for the Prince of Wales, and each one sought to carve out his own particular niche, inevitably different from that of his father. And while disputes of this nature occur in many a family, the fall-out among Royals was a very different matter. Thus the strained relationship between family man George III and his wayward son, subsequently George IV, tended to push people into one or the other camp.

The above obviously does not do justice to the topics or the speakers, who as far as I was concerned could all have talked for much longer, and the subjects all merit more reading. Moreover, it is hardly surprising, with mention being made of the Act of Union of 1707 and the Jacobite rebellions, that there was subsequent discussion then and throughout the weekend of the upcoming Scottish referendum, the results of which are meantime known. There was also very much a sense throughout the talks and at some of the exhibitions visited (for example of political cartoons from the Hanoverian age and the present day, at the Wilhelm Busch museum) of 'plus ça change' in the world of Royalty and politics!

After lunch we made our way to Herrenhausen palace and its beautiful gardens and dispersed according to interests and energy (palace grounds, botanical garden, exhibition on Hannovers Herrscher auf Englands Thron). Dinner at the side of the Maschsee concluded a highly pleasant day (and a few returned to Herrenhausen to enjoy the spectacular firework display). On Sunday morning, we met at the Landesmuseum for an excellently presented exhibition on Als die Royals aus Hannover kamen. The 'rump' of our party enjoyed a last meal together before we all left for home, heads reeling with Georges, wives and mistresses (this last group often quasi official and frequently consulted by government ministers).

Ursula and Brian Rouvray had organised everything to perfection, and everyone expressed thanks for their enabling us all to have such a wonderful weekend. There is, alas, insufficient space to cover the clash between a strong-willed satnav and a strong-willed driver, lenient local police, the mystery of the missing garments, or the candlelight breakfast in one hotel when 'the lamps went out'.

Page 5

And on a serious note again, our distinguished speaker at Coburg last year, Lord Lexden, has written an illuminating essay on the lead-in to the establishment of the Hanoverian dynasty, and he has kindly consented to our including it via the link given below. Lord Lexden will be giving a lecture based on this essay on 20 November to the British-German Association in London at the German Historical Institute in Bloomsbury Square.

http://www.alistairlexden.org.uk/news/lord-lexden-marks-tercentenary-start-hanoverian-monarchy

A final footnote to all the above, as a matter of interest: A special service is to be held in London in October to commemorate the Hanoverian accession and the coronation of George I. It will include music and readings from the actual coronation 300 years ago, and is to reflect and celebrate the rich heritage of the Georgian legacy as well as the cultural links between Britain and Germany.

 More Anglo-German links

On 18 September, the Editor and yours truly were in Weimar for a ceremonial unveiling of a memorial plaque to commemorate the visit there, from August to October 1854, of George Henry Lewes and George Eliot (the pen name of Mary Ann Evans). During this period, Lewes was able to complete his research and much of the writing of his classic Life of Goethe, the first full Goethe biography in any language. Eliot deepened her already broad knowledge of German culture, which was to have such a strong influence on both her non-fictional and fictional output. The plaque was unveiled by Bob Muscutt and was financed by the George Eliot Fellowship and its members.

Jadwiga Bobrowska

The editor's rag bag

Is anyone else irritated by the practice of 'doctoring' British novels for the American market? The Americanisations often stand out because the author would never has used them and they disturb the tone of the book: for example, a reference in a Ruth Rendell novel to someone being 'mad as hell' (i.e. furious) I've never noticed the reverse being done to American novels for UK readers – is it?

Page 6

GS Diary

8th – 12th October

Frankfurt am Main book fair. The guest of honour this year is Finland

8th November

GS Translators' Workshop in Frankfurt am Main. For more information see below.

 2015

7th March

AGM in Duisburg, followed by lunch and a guided tour of the town. The agenda for the AGM with full details will be sent out early in the new year.

May

Anglophoner Tag in Kassel, organised by the Hesse BDÜ. The person to contact is Valessa Steinke at valessa-steinke@t-online.de .

4th – 6th September

GS study weekend in Cambridge

This continues a long tradition of happy visits to and from Cambridge on the part of the Cambridge and German CIoL societies (with one wonderful detour to Graz).

 Final reminder!!

 GS Translators' Workshop - Frankfurt am Main

Saturday 8th November from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

 For those who haven't yet registered (see below), the deadline now is 25 October.

 We meet at the Gewerkschaftshaus, Wilhelm-Leuschner-Strasse 69. This is a short walk from Frankfurt main station, or a tram ride of just one stop to Baseler Platz. Lunch will be at a nearby Chinese-Mongolian restaurant.

 The programme is as follows:

 Gottfried Röckelein: Literarische Übersetzungen

 Isabelle Thormann: Rechtssprache/German legalese

 Ilse Freiburg: Translation of questionnaires

 Kirti Seetharam: Human Resources: Different cultures, different translations

 The cost is €40 for GS and BDÜ members, and €50 for non-members, payable to the CIoL GS Society, IBAN: DE 66 3004 0000 0751 1553 00, BIC: COBADEFFXXX. Please notify GS secretary Jadwiga that you have paid and will be attending at J.Bobrowska@gmx.net  

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

The Newsletter of the Chartered Institute of Linguists German Society e.V.

 July 2014

 

Letter from the Chair

 

After talking about previous study weekends in Hanover, we realised that this year’s study weekend was the 23rd in the history of the GS. Since most of our members live so far apart, each weekend is an excellent opportunity to meet up, discover a new area and learn more about a variety of subjects. The topics have ranged from minority languages in Germany (Sorbian, Danish, Platt et al), historical links between Germany and the UK (Prince Albert, the Hanoverians etc), literature (Fontane) to the Battle of Blenheim and an escape from Colditz. Each study weekend depends to a large extent on the organisers who sacrifice a lot of time, thought and effort to create a successful event, for which we are always extremely grateful.

 

This year’s visit to Hanover was well-organised by local members Brian and Ursula Rouvray. They also managed to cope with the inconvenience of two triathlons in the centre of Hanover as well as the train drivers’ strike on Saturday! Our speakers gave us a fascinating historical insight into the Hanoverian dynasty which enabled us to get a lot more from the various exhibitions we visited. Most of us managed to spot several pictures and caricatures which had been shown in the  presentations. The Scottish Referendum debate added extra interest, since the political union of England and Scotland occurred just before the Hanoverians came to the throne. Unfortunately we were not in Hanover for the Last Night of the Proms or we could have joined the “Public Viewing” in the park! For a full report see page 3.

 

Our last event in 2014 is the Translators’ Workshop in Frankfurt am Main. There are a few places still available, so book now. We’re very grateful to Mike Harrington and Ilse Freiburg for organising the workshop with such a varied selection of topics. Full details are on page 6.

 

Finally, put the date of the 2015 AGM in your diaries. We will be in Duisburg on Saturday 7th March. After the AGM we hope to have a guided tour by local mathematician and philosopher Gerhard Mercator.

 

All the best from me and the Committee.

 

Stephanie

 

Page 2

 

A welcome blast from the past

 

(After the AT in Potsdam, Janet Berridge also had the opportunity to attend the opening event of the annual AIIC Conference in Berlin, and has kindly written this report.

 

Although I consider myself a founder member of the German Society of the Institute of Linguists (having been part of the group who called the regional group into being in the late 1980s and serving as chairman from 1988 to 1990), my connections with the group in recent years have been rather sporadic, as I have lived in England since 1995. However, having met my husband on the society's first "trip east", to Weimar in 1991, I am very happy to maintain my ties and to join colleagues occasionally at meetings, as I did in 2011 in Heidelberg. In 2005 I bought a flat in east Berlin and we now spend a considerable amount of time in the German capital. When I saw that the Anglophoner Tag 2014 would take place in Potsdam, I was determined to join the party: I was not disappointed.

 

The event was – no surprise – very well run, and there was ample opportunity to catch up with old friends and make new contacts. The contributions were all well prepared and informative and the evening boat trip a delightful climax to the weekend. What really impressed me deeply, however, was the talk, backed up by an excellent exhibition, by Elke Limberger-Katsumi: "The pioneers and their achievement: Simultaneous interpreting proves a success at the Nuremberg trials."

 

Not being an interpreter myself, I only have a passive knowledge of the highly skilled nature of this profession. I have often been asked to interpret at various events and have in most cases refused, pointing out that I am a translator and that there is a world of difference between the (passive) task of translating a text and the (very active) role of a simultaneous interpreter. I have done a little informal (mostly consecutive) interpreting for business and for an English tour guide who takes people interested in space flight to Peenemünde on the Baltic coast.

 

The story that Elke Limberger-Katsumi had to tell was both fascinating and poignant. Amid the turmoil of the final stages of the last World War, the plan to try the Nazi leaders for crimes against humanity at an internationally recognized court began to take shape. The legal requirements were clear: judges from the four Allied powers (the USA, Great Britain, France and Russia), legal representatives for the accused and the witnesses. The big problem was: there were at least 4 languages involved (English, French, Russian and German). Making the trials happen and achieving the logistical goal of bringing all the players together in war-ravaged Nürnberg and providing simultaneous interpreting on this scale was an epic task. It was essential to find linguists capable of interpreting under pressure and of maintaining a totally neutral stance throughout, despite the harrowing testimonies. The technical details look primitive at a distance of almost 70 years: cabling ran all over the floors, and recording was often interrupted when someone tripped over the cables; the "booths" were not sound-proofed, and housed three interpreters at a time, working from one language into the three others and back. Nevertheless, the task was achieved: people of mixed parentage who had lived in various European countries were in demand; some had not interpreted before, and training was given. Interrogations of the accused served as a "practice ground" for the trials.

 

Page 3

 

The fact that this all took place so long ago means that very few of the interpreters are still alive, but some of them left written or spoken testimony of their experience, and the AIIC exhibition featuring information panels with biographical details of many of the men and women who undertook this work was very informative. Most recently a book by one of the Russian interpreters had shed light on the Soviet side of the trials.

 

Since the Anglophoner Tag, the exhibition (and Elke's wonderful, personal presentation) has been on show at the AIIC Annual Congress in Berlin. Further events on this topic are scheduled for the autumn in Nürnberg.

 

Janet Berridge

 

GS study weekend in Hanover

 

Despite the best efforts of Deutsche Bahn and Lufthansa, we all made it to Hanover one way or another for a full, enjoyable and informative weekend (a tradition of over 20 years' standing now). After the usual happy get-together on the Friday evening, the programme proper kicked off on Saturday morning with our three excellent speakers.

 

The first was Nicola Hayton, President of the Deutsch-Britische Gesellschaft Rhein-Neckar, whom some of you will remember from the Study Weekend in Heidelberg in 2011. Nicola's talk was entitled 'From would-be monarch to a reluctant king: the role of family in the Hanoverian succession'. Her invaluable handout included a Stuart and Hanoverian family tree, to which I at least will continue to refer when memory fails and confusion intrudes. And the story began with Nicola's talk in Heidelberg in 2011, with 'The Winter Queen', daughter of James I, and her daughter Sophia, who against all the odds 'did well for herself', and was the mother of the man who became George I.

Our first George didn't speak English, and came to Britain as it were malgré soi, at a time when Europe was seriously divided along religious lines. Many other aspirants to the throne were cast aside simply because they were not Protestants, a major concern at the time being to ensure a Protestant succession. Incidentally, we learned that the Union flag dates back to 1606, showing the Scottish saltire cross firmly to the fore. More on this subject later on.

 

While Georges I and II visited Hanover, George III never did, perhaps making his statement that 'I wish I was back in Hanover to get myself a belly full' all the more remarkable. Dr. Thorsten Riotte of the history faculty at Frankfurt am Main's Goethe University spoke on whether this statement really did constitute a serious wish or intention to abdicate (a controversial issue in academic circles). At a time when Pitt the Younger was perceived as pulling the strings, and when 'Farmer George' was prey to recurrent and severe illness thought at the time to be insanity, both speculation and criticism were rife. While George III definitely saw himself as a Hanoverian prince, he was born and bred in England and 'gloried in the name of Briton'. It was said at one point indeed that 'Elector George was willing to declare war on King George'. However, Thorsten concluded that he did not think there had been a real threat of abdication.

Finally, Andrew Thompson, Director of Studies at Queen's College Cambridge, addressed us on 'Fathers and sons: politics, argument and family among the Hanoverians'. The backdrop to events and sentiment was the all-too-vivid and traumatic memory of regicide, the role of a strong, hierarchical church, and the equation of Catholicism with foreign rule. Andrew mentioned incidentally that the terms Whig and Tory, depicting the two mainstream political groupings of the time, were both insults from the Celtic fringe. It was generally perceived at the time, too, that Britain was different,

 

Page 4 

 

liberal and separate (well the first and last points certainly still apply!). It is sometimes claimed that the Hanoverian father-son disagreements had purely psychological origins (George II for example responded strongly to George I's banishment of his wife), but Andrew saw other reasons as well. For one thing, there was no clearly defined role for the Prince of Wales, and each one sought to carve out his own particular niche, inevitably different from that of his father. And while disputes of this nature occur in many a family, the fall-out among Royals was a very different matter. Thus the strained relationship between family man George III and his wayward son, subsequently George IV, tended to push people into one or the other camp.

 

The above obviously does not do justice to the topics or the speakers, who as far as I was concerned could all have talked for much longer, and the subjects all merit more reading. Moreover, it is hardly surprising, with mention being made of the Act of Union of 1707 and the Jacobite rebellions, that there was subsequent discussion then and throughout the weekend of the upcoming Scottish referendum, the results of which are meantime known. There was also very much a sense throughout the talks and at some of the exhibitions visited (for example of political cartoons from the Hanoverian age and the present day, at the Wilhelm Busch museum) of 'plus ça change' in the world of Royalty and politics!

 

After lunch we made our way to Herrenhausen palace and its beautiful gardens and dispersed according to interests and energy (palace grounds, botanical garden, exhibition on Hannovers Herrscher auf Englands Thron). Dinner at the side of the Maschsee concluded a highly pleasant day (and a few returned to Herrenhausen to enjoy the spectacular firework display). On Sunday morning, we met at the Landesmuseum for an excellently presented exhibition on Als die Royals aus Hannover kamen. The 'rump' of our party enjoyed a last meal together before we all left for home, heads reeling with Georges, wives and mistresses (this last group often quasi official and frequently consulted by government ministers).

 

Ursula and Brian Rouvray had organised everything to perfection, and everyone expressed thanks for their enabling us all to have such a wonderful weekend. There is, alas, insufficient space to cover the clash between a strong-willed satnav and a strong-willed driver, lenient local police, the mystery of the missing garments, or the candlelight breakfast in one hotel when 'the lamps went out'.

 

Page 5

 

And on a serious note again, our distinguished speaker at Coburg last year, Lord Lexden, has written an illuminating essay on the lead-in to the establishment of the Hanoverian dynasty, and he has kindly consented to our including it via the link given below. Lord Lexden will be giving a lecture based on this essay on 20 November to the British-German Association in London at the German Historical Institute in Bloomsbury Square.

 

http://www.alistairlexden.org.uk/news/lord-lexden-marks-tercentenary-start-hanoverian-monarchy

 

A final footnote to all the above, as a matter of interest: A special service is to be held in London in October to commemorate the Hanoverian accession and the coronation of George I. It will include music and readings from the actual coronation 300 years ago, and is to reflect and celebrate the rich heritage of the Georgian legacy as well as the cultural links between Britain and Germany.

 

More Anglo-German links

 

On 18 September, the Editor and yours truly were in Weimar for a ceremonial unveiling of a memorial plaque to commemorate the visit there, from August to October 1854, of George Henry Lewes and George Eliot (the pen name of Mary Ann Evans). During this period, Lewes was able to complete his research and much of the writing of his classic Life of Goethe, the first full Goethe biography in any language. Eliot deepened her already broad knowledge of German culture, which was to have such a strong influence on both her non-fictional and fictional output. The plaque was unveiled by Bob Muscutt and was financed by the George Eliot Fellowship and its members.

 

Jadwiga Bobrowska

 

The editor's rag bag

 

Is anyone else irritated by the practice of 'doctoring' British novels for the American market? The Americanisations often stand out because the author would never has used them and they disturb the tone of the book: for example, a reference in a Ruth Rendell novel to someone being 'mad as hell' (i.e. furious) I've never noticed the reverse being done to American novels for UK readers – is it?

 

 

Page 6

 

GS Diary

 

8th – 12th October

Frankfurt am Main book fair. The guest of honour this year is Finland

 

8th November

GS Translators' Workshop in Frankfurt am Main. For more information see below.

 

2015

 

7th March

AGM in Duisburg, followed by lunch and a guided tour of the town. The agenda for the AGM with full details will be sent out early in the new year.

 

May

Anglophoner Tag in Kassel, organised by the Hesse BDÜ. The person to contact is Valessa Steinke at valessa-steinke@t-online.de .

 

4th – 6th September

GS study weekend in Cambridge

This continues a long tradition of happy visits to and from Cambridge on the part of the Cambridge and German CIoL societies (with one wonderful detour to Graz).

 

Final reminder!!

 

GS Translators' Workshop - Frankfurt am Main

Saturday 8th November from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

 

For those who haven't yet registered (see below), the deadline now is 25 October.

 

We meet at the Gewerkschaftshaus, Wilhelm-Leuschner-Strasse 69. This is a short walk from Frankfurt main station, or a tram ride of just one stop to Baseler Platz. Lunch will be at a nearby Chinese-Mongolian restaurant.

 

The programme is as follows:

 

Gottfried Röckelein: Literarische Übersetzungen

 

Isabelle Thormann: Rechtssprache/German legalese

 

Ilse Freiburg: Translation of questionnaires

 

Kirti Seetharam: Human Resources: Different cultures, different translations

 

The cost is €40 for GS and BDÜ members, and €50 for non-members, payable to the CIoL GS Society, IBAN: DE 66 3004 0000 0751 1553 00, BIC: COBADEFFXXX. Please notify GS secretary Jadwiga that you have paid and will be attending at J.Bobrowska@gmx.net  

 

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

 

 

The Newsletter of the Chartered Institute of Linguists German Society e.V.

 

July 2014

 

Letter from the Chair

 

Dear Members,

 

Summer is officially here and the days are already getting shorter! Over the longest days of the year the GS hosted a very successful Anglophoner Tag in Potsdam, and a full report is on page 2. The Anglophoner Tag is an excellent networking opportunity for linguists from all over Germany and the UK. We had a fascinating selection of speakers, and the networking events were very popular, despite the fact that participants missed most of the World Cup match between Germany and Ghana! The most enthusiastic managed to watch the last 15 minutes in the hotel bar.

 

This was the 20th Anglophoner Tag, and next year the BDÜ Hessen will be hosting the event in Kassel in May. Many thanks are due to John Graham, whose ideas led to the first Anglophoner Tag in Xanten in 1995 and who is still very much involved.

 

Our next event is the study weekend in Hanover in September, and our speakers are some of the leading Hanoverian experts. Unfortunately Prince Andrew has already been to Hanover, but Brian and Ursula Rouvray have set up a very interesting programme. There are only a few places left, so if you are interested please contact the Rouvrays as soon as possible. For details please see page 4.

 

After a year’s absence, the Translators’ Workshop is making a return this November, thanks to Mike Harrington and Ilse Freiburg. They have organised an excellent programme, and we hope to see many of you in Frankfurt. For more information see page 4.

 

I hope you all have a good summer. All the best from me and the Committee.

Stephanie

 

Page 2

 

Potsdam revisited: Anglophoner Tag 2014, June 20th till 22nd

 

'Revisited' because the GS had a Study Weekend there in 1998. It was great being there again.

 

We kick-started the event in a slightly stressful but amusing manner on the Friday evening at the “Hinzenbergklause” on the banks of the Havel. The work ethic of the catering staff was one of determined, East German, on-the-dot efficiency, whereby anyone arriving more than five minutes after the set time of 7.30 (e.g. those who had dallied too long in Sanssouci’s parks and palaces) found their main course and starter already on the table. But this helped to break the ice and get us networking straight away – the main point of the Anglophoner Tag.

 

Networking was emphasised as the core element of the Anglophoner Tag by John Graham in his brief introductory talk on Saturday morning in the impressive GDR-style Mercure Hotel. He gave us the history of the AT since its first meeting in Xanten in 1995. The AT had developed from grass-roots initiatives for greater professional and social cohesion between German and English regional groups and their parent associations (BDÜ, CIoL, Aticom, ITI, DTT). The Xanten meeting was the first of a highly successful series.

 

Ralph Elliott covered a wealth of material in his one-hour slot on CAT tools. He was able to skip the concept and history of computer-aided translation tools, as a show of hands indicated that four-fifths of those present already used them. Ralph could therefore concentrate on the aspects which we at the work-face find most important: the pros and cons of the various systems on the market, the volume of data they use in their translation memories (TM), and the efficiency of their search and concordance features. He feels that most systems are becoming too dependent on Microsoft. TRADOS Studio is the most widely used, but MemoQ, which uses less data space, is catching up. Top-of-the-range but highly expensive is Star Transit NXT. A thorny problem is that many of the system providers are also translation agencies, posing the risk of breaching confidentiality agreements and intellectual-property theft, particularly as the TM essentially contains the complete source and target texts.

 

The theme of this year’s AT was “Translation and the remembrance of things past”, and, following Ralph’s practical interpretation, the next two speakers, Paul Daniels and Elke Limberger-Katsumi, took a more historical approach. In “Who remembers Weimar Germany”, Paul described his blog “Die Weltbühne in English translation”, dealing with writers and journalists such as Karl Kraus and Kurt Tucholsky, both neglected in English translation. Yet to understand the moral and political state of the Weimar Republic and its failure prior to the rise of the Third Reich, it is essential to read as many writers as possible from that period and not just rely on English-speaking commentators such as Christopher Isherwood, who, in his “Cabaret” painted a picture of the hopelessness and escapism in the face of the Nazi threat. Paul criticised historians’ and political commentators’ approach of “arguing backwards” and of “relativism” (cf. “Historikerstreit” of the 1980s). To really appreciate this very wide subject field, one needs to delve into Paul’s blog, http://weltbuehneenglishtranslation.wordpress.com, where he has taken it upon himself to translate into English works from the Weimar period, a mammoth task for which he deserves much admiration.

 

Elke Limberger-Katsumi’s fascinating talk “Ein Prozess – Vier Sprachen / The pioneers and their achievement: Simultaneous interpreting proves a success at the Nuremberg Trials” complemented the exhibition of posters with the biographies of the pioneers, which Elke had set up in our meeting room. Created by AIIC Germany Region (www.aiic.de) the exhibition will also be on show during the FIT Conference in Berlin in

 

Page 3

 

August and at “Saal 600” in Nuremberg itself. The trials were the first time that simultaneous interpreting was employed on a large scale. The technology had only recently been developed; the interpreters received scant training and were under constant physical and emotional stress, particularly those who had experienced the horrors of Nazi Germany first hand. Few records have been kept of the large number of interpreters who worked during the trials, but the more the AIIC have researched into their identity, the more names and details have emerged. Though sparse, some recorded material has become available, such as the gramophone records from Margot Botlin (nicknamed “The Passionate Haystack” because of her hairdo and lively gestures), which were purchased on eBaybut which have yet to be played due to the lack of suitable equipment. Some memoirs exist, such as those of Tatiana Stupnikova, which have been recently published in German in collaboration with the University of Mainz-Germersheim. One of the few interpreters still living, Peter Less, was celebrating his 93rd birthday on the day of our meeting. This was duly honoured (see below). Participants’ coffee breaks were spent reading the pioneers’ resumés – a moving experience.

 

After lunch, tour guide Jacob Sandler spoke to us on a related topic: “The Potsdam Conference in Cecilienhof”. The Cecilienhof Palace, which we visited on Sunday morning, played host to the last of a series of conferences between Churchill/Attlee, Roosevelt/Truman and Stalin from 1943 to 1945. Given its proximity to Berlin it was the ideal venue. This conference too involved plenty of hard work for the consecutive interpreters due to the vast array of topics: the fate of defeated Germany (Morgenthau Plan); the ultimatum to Japan, leading to the nuclear attacks; and the progression towards the splitting of Europe into two blocs. Jacob finished with a sombre comment: Since the end of World War II the world has known only seven days of complete peace.

 

Martin Bindhardt’s final talk, “An Introduction to Transactional Analysis”, gave the participants ample food for discussion as they wondered whether they were “adapted children” or “critical adults”. However, before exchanging views, we all got together to sing Peter Less 'Happy Birthday', which Isabelle Thormann recorded on her phone and sent to his daughter, much to his pleasure. We also took the opportunity to thank Stephanie Tarling and the Committee for their excellent organization. Our very best wishes to Soheila Dayani and Jacob Phillips on their marriage had already been extended at the opening of the conference.

 

The evening boat trip along the Havel, through the two Wannsees and back into Potsdam under the Glienicker Brücke, was pure enjoyment, despite or because of the lack of football. On Sunday morning the Potsdam Conference exhibition at Cecilienhof vividly reflected the contents of Jacob Sandler’s talk. After taking all that in, we needed fresh air, nature and beauty: a walk through the Neuer Garten to the old Russian colony of Alexandrowka, where a man with a Russian surname and a Berlin accent sold us gorgeous cherries.

 

Mike Harrington

 

Page 4

 

German Society Study Weekend 2014 – Royal Hanover

5th – 7th September

 

There are still a few places available for stragglers. There has been just one minor change of plan: Instead of a guided tour of Hanover on the Sunday morning, we'll be visiting the Landesmuseum for the exhibition on 'Hannovers Herrscher auf Englands Thron 1714 – 1837'. For full details and to sign up, please contact Brian and Ursula Rouvray at bu.rouvray@web.de

 

GS Translators' Workshop

Frankfurt am Main

Saturday 8th November from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

 

Meet at the Gewerkschaftshaus, Wilhelm-Leuschner-Strasse 69. This is a short walk from Frankfurt main station, or a tram ride of just one stop to Baseler Platz. Lunch will be at a nearby Chinese-Mongolian restaurant.

 

The programme is as follows:

 

Gottfried Röckelein: Literarische Übersetzungen

 

Isabelle Thormann: Rechtssprache/German Legalese

 

Ilse Freiburg: Translation of questionnaires

 

Kirti Seetharam: Human Resources: Different cultures, different translations

 

The cost is €40 for GS and BDÜ members, and €50 for non-members, payable to the CIoL GS Society, IBAN: DE 66 3004 0000 0751 1553 00, BIC: COBADEFFXXX. Please notify GS secretary Jadiwga that you have paid and will be attending at J.Bobrowska@gmx.net

 

The editor's rag bag

 

Spotted in a shop near me, a garment described as a 'mash top'. I suspect they meant mesh or meshed (I've also seen 'crash' when they obviously meant crushed), but perhaps the top was in fact modelled on something worn in the popular US tv series set in Korea??

 

It's official: we don't belong!

 

In these turbulent times, borders can change very quickly. However, if (a stamp has been issued for mail being sent beyond the confines of the UK to ‘Europe’- edited by webmaster), the UK is no longer in Europe, it has at least been a peaceful severance that has gone largely unnoticed. So is the UK now 'The Lost Continent'?

 

Page 5

 

I pointed out some time ago that a number of cinemas were now showing live broadcasts and recordings of plays from London's National Theatre. In the meantime, there are also infrequent live broadcasts from the Royal Shakespeare Company in Stratford. Since the number of cinemas showing the various broadcasts is increasing all the time, it is worth checking the respective theatre websites to find out where your nearest venues are.

 

****

 

GS Diary

 

4th – 6th August

F.I.T. XXth World Congress in Berlin.For full details, see http://www.fit2014.org.

 

5th – 7th September

GS Study weekend in Hanover. For more information and to register, see p.4.

 

8th – 12th October

Frankfurt am Main book fair. The guest of honour this year is Finland

 

8th November

GS Translators' Workshop in Frankfurt am Main. For more information see page 4.

 

May 2015

Anglophoner Tag in Kassel, organised by the Hesse BDÜ. The person to contact is Valessa Steinke at valessa-steinke@t-online.de.

 

Early alert: 2015 Study weekend in Cambridge from 4th – 6th September.

This continues a long tradition of happy visits to and from Cambridge on the part of the Cambridge and German CIoL societies (with one wonderful detour to Graz).

 

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

 

The Newsletter of the Chartered Institute of Linguists German Society e.V.

 

April 2014

 

Letter from the Chair

 

This newsletter is a shorter edition than usual, to give you details of the upcoming events and the minutes of the AGM in Neuss.

 

After the letter sent out via London we have a lot of new names on our mailing list, which is very pleasing. The German Society has been in existence for almost 30 years and we are definitely one of the most active and successful CIoL societies, despite the difficulties caused by members living so far apart. If any members have a suggestion for a local meeting or would like to organise the AGM in their area, please get in touch – we need feedback!

 

We had a very interesting AGM weekend in Neuss. Many thanks to our treasurer, Andreas Busse, for organising the event - we managed to try out three excellent restaurants in two days. Thanks are also due to Jadwiga Bobrowska for arranging a tour of Neuss including the Globe Theatre. We enjoyed a fascinating tour of the theatre, where no seats are further than 10 metres from the stage and microphones are not necessary. A definite highlight was the excerpt from Romeo and Juliet.

 

The AGM was very successful, and we were particularly delighted to see Bernard Hudson, who still likes to be involved, even at the age of 94 - a shining example to us all! Unfortunately, due to ill health, Gabriele Matthey had to resign as secretary after 25 years. Many thanks to her for all her hard work and input during that time – we’ll miss her help. Jadwiga Bobrowksa is our new secretary - she’s been a very active member for many years and has efficiently organised study weekends and other events.

 

We still have some places available for the Anglophoner Tag in Potsdam (see page 4) and also for the study weekend in Hanover (see page 5). Next year’s study weekend will probably be in Cambridge, organised by the Cambridge Society. For 2016 we also have a likely destination – the Hunsrück, home of the Heimat films.

 

All the best from me and the Committee. Hope to see you in Potsdam or Hanover.

Stephanie

 

Page 2

 

Minutes of 2014 German Society of the CIoL AGM

 

The meeting opened at 11.15 a.m. with some words of welcome from Andreas Busse, organiser of the venue and native of the town of Neuss.

 

1. Apologies for absence

Apologies for absence had been received from Heidi English and Glynis Thompson.

 

2. Approval of agenda

The agenda for the meeting was approved unanimously.

 

3. Approval of minutes of 2013 AGM

The minutes of the 2013 AGM were approved unanimously.

 

4. Chairman's report

Stephanie Tarling delivered the chairman's report. A resumé of 2013 events was given. Stephanie reported that regular Skype committee meetings were held. She also reported that the response to the Institute's email to all Institute members in Germany had been extremely positive, with a considerable number establishing contact with the German Society.

 

5. Treasurer's report

The books for 2013 had previously been audited by Mike Harrington and Jadwiga Bobrowska and all found to be in order. The Treasurer reported a healthy financial balance.

 

6. Formal approval of committee's actions

The committee's actions for the past year were approved unanimously by the meeting with thanks (proposer Jadwiga Bobrowska, seconder Isabelle Thormann).

 

7. Formal approval of treasurer's actions

The treasurer's actions for the past year were approved unanimously by the meeting with thanks (proposer Guglielmo Fittante, seconder Roy Virtue).

 

8. Election of chairman and vice-chairman

Chairman Stephanie Tarling and Vice-Chairman Norman Ellis both declared themselves willing to stand for re-election and were duly re-elected unanimously by the meeting, with thanks (proposer Jadwiga Bobrowska, seconder Andreas Busse; proposer Roy Virtue, seconder Frances Mechan-Schmidt).

 

9. Extraordinary election of secretary

Sincere thanks were expressed to outgoing secretary Gabriele Matthey for her many years of excellent service to the German Society, and a gift will be presented to her in appreciation of all that she has done for the Society over the years.

Jadwiga Bobrowska declared that she was willing to stand for the post of secretary and was elected unanimously by the meeting (proposer Guglielmo Fittante, seconder Mike Harrington).

 

Page 3

 

10. 2014 Anglophoner Tag

Stephanie Tarling gave an update on the forthcoming Anglophoner Tag in Potsdam in June. Further information and a reminder are to be sent to various organisations. Thanks were expressed to Stephanie for all her hard work in organising the AT.

 

11. Study weekend in Hanover

Brian Rouvray gave an update, confirming that all arrangements had been made. A reminder was to be sent out regarding registration deadlines. Thanks were expressed to the Rouvrays for their excellent organisation.

 

12. GS translators' workshop in Frankfurt/Main

The venue has been booked, as has the restaurant, and there are now four speakers. Final details of the titles are to be notified soon.

 

13. Other future events

The 2015 study weekend will be hosted by the Cambridge Society, probably in September. Outline plans were presented for the 2016 study weekend in the Eifel, major topics being translating for the film industry and the Hunsrück dialect (thanks to Heidi English and Jadwiga Bobrowska).

 

14. AOB

It was reported that the CIoL now has a new website incorporating more information about the various societies. Irrespective of this, it was decided, with thanks to Norman Ellis, that the German Society would maintain its own website.

 

15. Date and venue of next GS AGM

The next GS AGM will be held in Duisburg on 7th March 2015.

 

The meeting closed at 12.30.

 

After the AGM

 

A footnote to the AGM in Neuss: After the meeting and lunch we were treated to a walking tour of the town, on which occasion our guide explained to the uninitiated that Neuss is definitely NOT part of Düsseldorf! The highlight of the tour was a visit to the Globe Theatre, where she had a surprise for us: Four 'volunteers' were called on to read excerpts from Romeo and Juliet, and we opted for an all-male production. As regards Guglielmo Fittante as Romeo and Norman Ellis as Juliet, I can only say, 'daß ich das noch erleben durfte'.

SL

 

Page 4

 

Anglophoner Tag 2014 in Potsdam, 20th to 22nd June

Hosted by the Chartered Institute of Linguists German Society e.V.

 

Location: Mercure Hotel Potsdam City

Lange Brücke, 14467 Potsdam

The hotel is about 5 minutes on foot from Potsdam Hauptbahnhof

 

Travel to Potsdam

From Berlin Schönefeld Airport there is a direct train (about 50 minutes) to Potsdam Hbf.

From Berlin Tegel Airport, airport bus to Bahnhof Zoo and then train or S-Bahn to Potsdam Hbf (about 45 minutes)

 

Topic

Translation and Remembrance of Things Past

 

Speakers

John Graham:                    Twenty Years of Anglophoner Tag

Paul Daniels:                     Who Remembers Weimar Germany?

Ralph Elliott:                    CAT tools

Aiic representative:           The pioneers and their achievement:

                                           Simultaneous interpreting at the Nuremberg trials.

Matthias Sandberg:           Potsdamer Konferenz in Cecilienhof

Martin Bindhardt:             An Introduction to Transactional Analysis

 

There will be the usual get-together on Friday evening and an optional boat trip with dinner on Saturday evening. On Sunday there is an optional visit to Cecilienhof, venue of the Potsdam Conference, followed by a choice of two walks, one rather more strenuous than the other.

 

The cost of the conference on Saturday, which includes welcome coffee/tea and croissants, lunch, conference drinks and two refreshment breaks, is €80. This is payable by 15th April (with the exception of people coming from the UK who do not have a euro account; they may pay in cash on the day), and the hotel contingents will be held until 20th May

 

For further information and a registration form please contact

 

Stephanie Tarling at setarling@t-online.de

 

Page 5

 

German Society Study Weekend 2014 – Royal Hanover

5th – 7th September

 

In this year of many commemorations of the accession of Hanoverian George I our study weekend will focus on some aspects of this major event. The venue is the Historisches Museum in Hanover, and the topics to be addressed are:

 

Nichola Hayton, Heidelberg: The role of George I’s family in the 1714 Succession.

 

Dr. Torsten Riotte, Frankfurt: “I wish I was back in Hanover to get myself a belly full.” Hanoverian kings and the abdication threat.

 

Dr. Andrew Thompson, Cambridge: Fathers and Sons: politics, argument and family

among the Hanoverians.

 

Again, there will be the usual get-together on Friday, and the conference will be followe